Author: jab10018

Connecticut’s ocean economy grew in 2014, report shows

Connecticut’s ocean economy grew by nearly 1 percent during 2014, with the tourism and recreation sector employing the most workers, and the ship and boat building sector contributing the highest value in terms of wages, according to a new federal report.
The report, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office for Coastal Management, shows employment growth nationally in the ocean economy of 2.5 percent from 2013 to 2014 and growth in goods and services of 15.6 percent from 2007 to 2014. The ocean economy includes living resources, marine construction, marine transportation, offshore mineral extraction, ship and boat building and tourism and recreation.
State-specific information in the report shows Connecticut’s ocean economy employed about 51,000 people, generating $2 billion in wages and $4.2 billion in gross domestic product. That’s just over 3 percent of the state’s total employment, about 2 percent of its wages and 1.7 percent of its GDP, according to the report.
Most of the ocean economy workforce was based in Fairfield County, in tourism and recreation-related businesses, according to the report. New London County, where submarine builder Electric Boat is located, supplied the largest proportion of the ocean economy GDP. The ship and boat building sector statewide contributed $1.4 billion of Connecticut’s total gross domestic products, the report found.
The report’s findings highlight the importance of the ocean economy to Connecticut. Although it is the nation’s third smallest state in land area, and 29th in population, it ranks 15th in ocean economy employment and 14th in GDP among the 30 coastal states.
More information can be found on the Economics: National Ocean Watch data page.

New guide to decapod larvae available

“Keys to the Larvae of Common Decapod Crustaceans in Long Island Sound,” a 48-page guide to the early life stages of lobsters, crabs and shrimp, was published this spring by Connecticut Sea Grant and Project Oceanology. Written by Howard “Mickey” Weiss, Project O founder and senior scientist, it includes black-and-white drawings identifying the main parts of the anatomies of various decapods, as well as color photos of more than a dozen species. For a free download of 21 MB copy, go to: Weiss Decapod Crustacean larvae book_Web
To purchase a print copy for $8 plus shipping, contact Andrea Kelly at: andrea.kelly@uconn.edu. Please reference the title and publication number CTSC-17-09.

Senate action is good news for Sea Grant

On a bipartisan vote, the Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday approved funding for the National Sea Grant program at $65 million for base programs and $11.5 million for Sea Grant aquaculture. Part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency budget, the funding for National Sea Grant supports Sea Grant programs in 33 states, including Connecticut Sea Grant. This follows similar action in the House of Representatives and bodes well for the future of Sea Grant, which had been slated for termination under the President’s budget proposal. Connecticut Sea Grant is grateful for the support that Congress has demonstrated for the program, and the services it provides to communities and the maritime economy. While changes could still be made before passage of a final budget, the prospects for Sea Grant are promising.