Invasive Species

Harmful Algae: A Compendium Desk Reference (executive summary)

By Tessa Getchis and Sandra Shumway. This 16-page booklet provides a summary of the key issues and state of the science pertaining to harmful algal blooms as presented in “Harmful Algal Blooms: A Compendium Desk Reference,” to improve management and response. Print copies are available from Connecticut Sea Grant by contacting: andrea.kelly@uconn.edu.

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2014 Shrimp Expedition – Research on Invasive Shrimp

Shrimp are tasty and good for you, right? So why worry about invasive shrimp coming to our shores? The reason for concern is that such invasive species often thrive and compete with native species, sometimes even driving them out, and may further impact the prey species of the shrimp as well. Dr. James T. Carlton, […]

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Aquatic Invasive Species Fact Sheet

A free one-page factsheet that answers common questions like: What are invasive species? Where do you find them? How do they affect property values? Free. Download here  

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Water Gardens and Invasive Plants

A free one-page fact sheet about invasive plants and how to avoid them in your water garden. Includes list of plants prohibited in Connecticut and buying tips. Free. Download here  

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Sea Squirts as Potential Vectors of Harmful Algal Introductions

Tessa L. Getchis, Maria Rosa, and Sandra E. Shumway This fact sheet is about research that shows connections between sea squirts (ascidian organisms) and harmful algal blooms. In some species, algal cells remain viable after being consumed by biofouling organisms, the invasive sea squirts. 4 pages, color illustrations. Free. Download PDF  

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The Vegetation Mosaic of Ragged Rock Creek Brackish Tidal Marsh, Connecticut River, Old Saybrook CT

William H. Moorhead III, Cary Chadwick, Sandy Prisloe, Juliana Barrett and Nels Barrett This study used the detailed plots-based floristic descriptions of traditional phytosociology to inform scenes of high resolution imagery to characterize and map, in detail, the brackish tidal wetland plant communities of Ragged Rock Creek. An emphasis was placed on providing a baseline […]

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Grateloupia turuturu, a Red Alga Invading Long Island Sound

Nancy C. Balcom 1-page 2-sided illustrated fact sheet. A red seaweed from Japan has appeared in Long Island Sound. This fact sheet describes what it looks like, why it is a problem, and what to do about reporting sightings of it. Illustrated. Free. Download here. $1.50 for postage and handling, free for pick up.  

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Aquatic Invasive Species of Long Island Sound Poster

Nancy C. Balcom A colorful poster depicting invasive species, with information on when they were reported in LIS. Cost: $2.50 per poster plus $1.50 for postage and handling if mailed. Free to K-12 teachers but postage and handling charges will apply.  

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Shipping Study I-A: A Study of the Introduction of Aquatic Nuisance Species by Vessels Entering the Great Lakes and Canadian Waters Adjacent to the United States

D.M. Reid and J.T. Carlton This study investigates the extent to which shipping contributes to the introduction of nonindigenous species into the Great Lakes and nearby Canadian Ports, and examines potential options for controlling such introductions. The combined results from this study with those from Shipping Study I provide a comprehensive picture of ballast water […]

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Shipping Study II: Biological invasions by nonindigenous species in United States Waters-quantifying the role of ballast water and sediments. (Parts I and II)

L.D. Smith, et al. This study examines the roles of ballast water and ballast sediments from foreign ports as vectors for the transport and release of nonindigenous species into U.S. coastal waters and ecosystems. It specifically examines the transport of ballast to Chesapeake Bay from global hot spots. 132 pp. Publication Number CONN-T-96-001 Available in […]

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Shipping Study I: The Role of Shipping in the Introduction of Nonindigenous Aquatic Organisms to the Coastal Waters of the United States (other than the Great Lakes) and an Analysis of Control Options

J.T. Carlton, D.M. Reid, and H. van Leeuwen Study investigated the extent to which shipping contributes to the introduction of nonindigenous species into U.S. waters; potential options for controlling such introductions; and the issue of whether this problem is of regional or national concern. Final Report, April 1995. 213 pp. Publication Number CG-D-11-95 Available in […]

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